Searching Out Your Irish Origin? Try the Origins Network!

Are you frustrated in your search for your Irish origin?  This post may help you break through that brick wall.  I don’t usually review one specific website on its own, but for this particular site, I had to make an exception. Today, I’m going to talk about the The Origins Network. If you’ve been having trouble tracing your Irish tree, this site may be the one that opens your Emerald Isle heritage up for you.

The Origins Network is probably THE most comprehensive site for British Isles genealogy on the web. It comes with four research options–Irish Origins, Scots Origins, British Origins, and Total Access. The Irish, British, and Total Access options are subscription-based (fortunately, the subscription prices are VERY reasonable…much cheaper than Ancestry.com, and with more pertinent records to your Irish search), while the Scots option is free. You can choose to subscribe to only one option, two options, or all three at once through the Total Access option. If you’re working primarily in Irish genealogy, you’ll obviously want to subscribe to the Irish option.

Once you’ve subscribed to the The Irish Origins Network, you’ll gain access to an astounding plethora of genealogical records from Ireland. With most of these records being from the 19th and early 20th centuries, you’ll be in prime shape to research any ancestors who came over during the Great Famine or shortly thereafter. Many of the records available on the site aren’t available anywhere else outside of Ireland.

What you’ll find is a multitude of census records, wills, directories, military records, burial records, maps and plats, and scanned images of record books. You’ll be able to view all of this on your computer, from the comfort of your own home. And, with hundreds of thousands of records available, you’re almost sure to find information on your Irish ancestors and your Irish origin. A subscription to the Irish Origins network is simply a must for anyone with Irish heritage from the 19th and 20th centuries. Believe me, once you subscribe, you’ll wonder why you didn’t do it sooner.

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